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The "Mysteries" Projects

These cutting-edge remote-viewing projects involves using remote viewing in a controlled and scientific manner to investigate some of the most spell-binding, spectacular, most intriguing, and most substantively important mysteries of all time. Boundaries are a thing of the past. Limits on what you "should" know are a thing of the past. "Forbidden knowledge" is a thing of the past. Here, remote viewers trained in a variety of methodologies reveal truths that you could previously have hardly imagined possible.

Forget the mainstream news media. Professional viewing, professional analysis, and creative targets is a mix that produces the most exciting reporting in the universe. This is the place where you will find the most important breakthroughs in public knowledge available anywhere. You won't get it anywhere else. And it is free.

Multiple Universes

 

Completed Projects Completion Date
The Great Pyramid of Giza 15 March 2014
The Atlantis Project 27 December 2012
The Creation of the Asteroid Belt: The Exploding Planet Hypothesis 10 August 2010
Evidence of Active Artificiality on Mars

Video report posted
25 June 2010.

Experimental Conditions:

These are "operational" projects which are executed differently from many of the scientific projects conducted at The Farsight Institute (such as the Multiple Universes Project, or the 2012 Climate Project, both of which are scientific projects). With operational projects, the public is normally not involved in verifying all aspects of the data collection process using encrypted, time-stamped, downloadable files, as is normally the case for scientific projects. Rather, with operational projects, we do all the work on our side and simply present the final results for the public to see. The goal of operational projects is to obtain information about certain targets, such as places and events, using the best methods that are available in a given situation.

There are other procedural differences between scientific projects and operational projects. With both scientific and operational projects, all viewers conduct their sessions totally "blind," which means that they are given no information regarding the targets for the sessions. But with operational projects, a viewer can be asked to re-do a session should the analyst feel that more information, or greater target penetration, would be possible with another attempt. Of course, no target information is given to the viewer when a request to re-do a session is made. Nonetheless, even that much information (i.e., that a re-do would be helpful) is not allowed for scientific projects. Also, for science projects, re-doing a session is not possible for a variety of practical reasons. For example, with our science projects, the selection of a target is normally done after the remote viewing sessions are already completed and made avaliable for public download as encrypted files. Thus, an analyst would have no way of knowing if a second attempt at a session would be advantageous in any way since the analyst would not know the identity of the target when the sessions are being conducted.

Finally, with scientific projects, ALL sessions submitted for a project must be included in the project and made available to the public. For operational projects, the analyst may decide to not include a session in the analysis if it is clear that the viewer did not perform well, which usually means that the remote-viewing session does not contain any information that describes verifiable aspects of a target. (This is called an "off" session.) This allows project coordinators more flexibility in encouraging many viewers to participate in the project, especially new and/or inexperienced viewers.

All targets for the Mysteries Project series are written by Courtney Brown and then subsequently approved as appropriate for the CRV and HRVG viewers by Lyn Buchanan and Glenn Wheaton. The viewers conduct all remote-viewing sessions totally blind to the targets. They are simply told that each target has a certain number of parts (typically three), and they should do a session for each part. The sessions are then submitted to Courtney Brown for subsequent analysis. The viewers are given complete target feedback only after all sessions have been collected from all viewers.

Important Links:

Personnel These people are working on this project.
RV ViewerResourses This link contains resources that are useful to the remote viewers participating in this study.